1887

Abstract

(Delivered at the 99th Ordinary Meeting of the Society for General Microbiology at Reading on 4 January 1984)*

THE ELEPHANT, OR THE FORCE OF HABIT

A tail behind, a trunk in front,

Complete the usual elephant.

A tail in front, a trunk behind,

Is what you very seldom find.

If you for specimens should hunt

With trunks behind and tails in front,

That hunt would occupy you long;

The force of habit is so strong.

(A. E. Housman, from by Laurence Housman; Jonathan Cape)

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1984-12-01
2022-01-23
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