1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

The cloned II N fragment of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) DNA has been shown to code for a 35K polypeptide. Subfragments made by cleavage with I, HI, II and II were then cloned and used with RNA extracted from HSV-2-infected cells for mRNA selection and protein synthesis. We found that the major translation product of such hybrid-selected mRNA has a molecular weight of 35000. By further mapping, DNA coding sequences for this mRNA were located within the region of II N, at approximately 0.585 to 0.596 genome map units. DNA sequences complementary to mRNA encoding a 56K polypeptide were located between 0.607 and 0.612 map units.

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1983-09-01
2021-10-24
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