1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Virus gene expression in rat cells transformed by either avian myelocytomatosis virus strain MC29 or avian erythroblastosis virus has been studied by biological and biochemical methods. In the clones examined, virus-specific sequences were found to be transcribed into RNA and, in most clones, the characteristic -related proteins could be identified. The transformed rat cells were fused to permissive chick cells and the rescued virus was shown to transform both chick embryo fibroblasts and the appropriate haemopoietic cell type in chick bone marrow cultures. These results clearly demonstrate that, as with the non-defective avian sarcoma viruses, the genetic information responsible for transformation by the defective avian leukaemia viruses can be expressed in non-permissive mammalian host cells as well as in permissive avian cells.

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1983-01-01
2021-10-23
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