1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

A quantitative analysis was made of the inactivation of MS 2 bacteriophage. Data were obtained relating the fraction of MS 2 surviving to the number of rabbit antibody molecules bound, from the minimum of one antibody molecule adsorbed per virus particle to a maximum of 80 to 85 per virus particle. Between 20 and 40 binding sites on the phage particle were critical, the covering of any one of which resulted in inactivation. In extreme antibody excess, approximately 10 of the phage population survived. In this antibody range, a maximum of 80 to 85 antibody molecules were bound to a phage particle leaving 95 to 100 antigenic sites free, explaining the small but constant probability of survival in extreme antibody excess (the persistent fraction).

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1970-01-01
2022-06-29
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