1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

The synthesis of influenza virus ribonucleoprotein structures (RNPs) in infected chick embryo cells was analysed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) in the presence of sodium deoxycholate which resolves the RNPs into five size classes. A relatively small proportion of total RNPs accumulated in the nucleus but free NP protein was found there in large amounts over the period 1.5 to 4 h post-infection. In contrast, by 4 h post-infection, all cytoplasmic NP was complexed into RNP structures. At early times, during a 15 min pulse of [S]methionine, nearly all the newly synthesized NP was incorporated into RNPs but by 4 h the majority of pulse-labelled NP was present as free protein. However, the proportion of free NP:NP in RNPs remained constant over the 1.5 to 4 h post-infection period, indicating that there was a delay before the NP synthesized later in infection was assembled into RNP structures. Individual RNP size classes were predominantly cytoplasmic and accumulated at similar rates but were not produced in equimolar amounts. The rates of synthesis of individual RNPs were in general agreement with their rates of accumulation with the remarkable exception of RNP d (containing RNA 7, the matrix protein gene). This was synthesized nearly 10-fold faster but accumulated at the same rate as the other RNPs. Possibly RNP d is more rapidly degraded than the other RNPs.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-59-2-403
1982-04-01
2022-01-26
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/59/2/JV0590020403.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-59-2-403&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Armstrong S. J., Barrv R. D. 1974; The topography of RNA synthesis in cells infected with fowl plague virus. Journal of General Virology 24:535–547
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Barrett T., Brownson J. M., Wolstenholme A. J., Mahy B. W. J. 1978; Studies on the synthesis of cRNA and vRNA in cells infected with influenza virus. In Negative Strand Viruses and the Host Cell pp 325–332 Edited by Mahy B. W. J., Barry R. D. London: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Barrett T., Wolstenholme A. J., Mahy B. W. J. 1979; Transcription and replication of influenza virus RNA. Virology 98:211–225
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Caliguiri L. A., Gerstein H. 1978; Subclasses of ribonucleoproteins in influenza virus-infected cells. Virology 90:119–132
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Compans R. W., Content J., Duesberg P. H. 1972; Structure of the ribonucleoprotein of influenza virus. Journal of Virology 10:795–800
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Cook R. F., Avery R. J., Dimmock N. J. 1979; Infection of chicken erythrocytes with influenza and other viruses. Infection and Immunity 25:396–402
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Duesberg P. H. 1969; Distinct subunits of the ribonucleoprotein of influenza virus. Journal of Molecular Biology 42:485–499
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Flawith J. W. F., dimmock N. J. 1979; Newly synthesized influenza virus proteins are transported from the nucleus. Journal of General Virology 45:527–531
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Fraser K. B. 1967; Immunofluorescence of abortive and complete infections by influenza A virus in hamster BHK 21 cells and mouse L cells. Journal of General Virology 1:1–12
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Hay A. J., Skehel J. J. 1975; Studies on the synthesis of influenza virus proteins. In Negative Strand Viruses and the Host Cell pp 635–656 Edited by Mahy B. W. J., Barry R. D. London: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Hay A. J., Lomniczi B., Bellamy A. R., Skehel J. J. 1977a; Transcription of the influenza virus genome. Virology 83:337–355
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Hay A. J., Abraham G., Skehel J. J., Smith J. C., Fellner P. 1977b; Influenza virus messenger RNAs are incomplete transcripts of the genome RNAs. Nucleic Acids Research 4:4197–4209
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Hudson J. B., Dimmock N. J. 1977; The use of nuclear monolayers in the study of influenza virus-infected cells. FEMS Microbiology Letters 1:325–327
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Inglis S. C., Mahy B. W. J. 1979; Polypeptides specified by the influenza virus genome. 3. Control of synthesis in infected cells. Virology 95:154–164
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Inglis S. C., Carroll A. R., Lamb R. A., Mahy B. W. J. 1976; Polypeptides specified by the influenza virus genome. 1. Evidence for eight distinct gene products specified by fowl plague virus. Virology 74:489–503
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Inglis S. C., Conti G., Mahy B. W. J. 1978; Control of influenza virus polypeptide synthesis. In Negative Strand Viruses and the Host Cell pp 239–248 Edited by Mahy B. W. J., Barry R. D. London: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Krug R. M. 1972; Cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic viral RNPs in influenza virus-infected MDCK cells. Virology 50:103–113
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Krug R. M., Etkind P. R. 1973; Cytoplasmic and nuclear virus-specific proteins in influenza virus-infected MDCK cells. Virology 56:334–348
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Krug R. M., Etkind P. R. 1975; Influenza virus-specific products in the nucleus and cytoplasm of infected cells. In Negative Strand Viruses and the Host Cell pp 555–572 Edited by Mahy B. W. J., Barry R. D. London: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Laemmli U. K. 1970; Cleavage of structural proteins during the assembly of the head of bacteriophage T4. Nature, London 227:680–685
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Lamb R. A., Choppin P. W. 1976; Synthesis of influenza virus proteins in infected cells: translation of viral polypeptides, including three P polypeptides, from RNA produced by primary transcription. Virology 74:504–519
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Mcgeoch D., Fellner P., Newton C. 1976; Influenza virus genome consists of eight distinct RNA species. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 73:3045–3049
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Maeno K., Kilbourne E. D. 1970; Developmental sequence and intracellular sites of synthesis of three structural protein antigens of influenza A2 virus. Journal of Virology 5:153–164
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Mark G. E., Taylor J. M., Herring L., Broni B., Krug R. M. 1978; Transcription and replication of the influenza virus genome early after infection. In Negative Strand Viruses and the Host Cell pp 333–340 Edited by Mahy B. W. J., Barry R. D. London: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Mark G. E., Taylor J. M., Broni B., Krug R. M. 1979; Nuclear accumulation of influenza viral RNA transcripts and the effects of cycloheximide, actinomycin D and a-amanitin. Journal of Virology 29:744–752
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Meier-Ewert H., Compans R. W. 1974; Time course of synthesis and assembly of influenza virus proteins. Journal of Virology 14:1083–1091
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Morser M. J., Kennedy S. I. T., Burke D. C. 1973; Virus-specified polypeptides in cells infected with Semliki Forest virus. Journal of General Virology 21:19–29
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Palese P., Schulman I. L. 1976; Differences in RNA patterns of influenza A viruses. Journal of Virology 17:876–884
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Pons M. W. 1971; Isolation of influenza virus ribonucleoprotein from infected cells. Demonstration of the presence of negative-stranded RNA in viral RNP. Virology 46:149–160
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Pons M. W. 1975; Influenza virus messenger ribonucleoprotein. Virology 67:209–218
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Pons M. W., Schulze I. T., Hirst G. K., Hauser R. 1969; Isolation and characterisation of the ribonucleoprotein of influenza virus. Virology 39:250–259
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Possee R. D., Schild G. C., Dimmock N. J. 1982; Studies on the mechanism of neutralization of influenza virus by antibody: evidence that neutralizing antibody (anti-haemagglutinin) inactivates influenza virus in vivo by inhibiting virion transcriptase activity. Journal of General Virology 58:373–386
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Rees P. J., Dimmock N. J. 1981a; Electrophoretic separation of influenza virus ribonucleoproteins. Journal of General Virology 53:125–132
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Rees P. J., Dimmock N. J. 1981b; Electrophoretic analysis of influenza virus ribonucleoproteins from purified virus and infected cells. In The Replication of Negative Strand Viruses pp 341–344 Proceedings of the 4th International Symposium of Negative Strand Viruses Edited by Bishop D. H. L., Compans R. W. Amsterdam: Elsevier/North-Holland;
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Scholtissek C., Rott R. 1970; Synthesis in vivo of influenza virus plus and minus strand RNA and its preferential inhibition by antibiotics. Virology 40:989–996
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Skehel J. J. 1972; Polypeptide synthesis in influenza virus-infected cells. Virology 49:23–36
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Skehel J. J. 1973; Early polypeptide synthesis in influenza virus-infected cells. Virology 56:394–399
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Sleigh M. J., Both G. W., Brownlee G. G. 1979; A new method for the size estimation of the RNA genome segments of influenza virus. Nucleic Acids Research 6:1309–1321
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Taylor J. M., Illmensee R., Litwin S., Herring L., Broni B., Krug R. M. 1977; Use of specific radioactive probes to study transcription and replication of the influenza virus genome. Journal of Virology 21:530–540
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-59-2-403
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-59-2-403
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error