1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Seven cell lines, transformed to a thymidine kinase-positive phenotype with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) DNA fragments, have been examined to determine their virus-specific DNA sequence content. The results are consistent with the reported map position of the HSV-2 thymidine kinase gene. Different cell lines contained different amounts of non-selected virus-specific sequences and this correlated with the ability of some cell lines to compensate the deficiencies in some temperature-sensitive () mutants of HSV-1 and HSV-2. The cell lines were also examined for their ability to synthesize elevated levels of thymidine kinase in response to infection with a thymidine kinase-negative virus mutant. Of the seven cell lines, two failed to respond to infection in this way and these cell lines lacked sequences on the upstream side of the kinase gene which were present in the remaining cell lines.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-58-1-127
1982-01-01
2022-06-29
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/58/1/JV0580010127.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-58-1-127&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Buchan A., Watson D. H., Dubbs D. R., Kit S. 1970; Serological study of a mutant of herpes simplex virus unable to stimulate thymidine kinase. Journal of Virology 5:817–818
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Clements J. B., Watson R. J., Wilkie N. M. 1977; Temporal regulation of herpes simplex virus type 1 transcription: location of transcripts on the viral genome. Cell 12:275–285
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Dixon R. A. F., Schaffer P. 1980; Fine structure mapping and functional analysis of temperature sensitive mutants in the gene encoding the herpes simplex virus type 1 immediate early protein VP175. Journal of Virology 36:189–203
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Easton A. J., Clements J. B. 1980; Temporal regulation of herpes simplex virus type 2 transcription and characterisation of immediate early mRNAs. Nucleic Acids Research 8:2627–2645
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Frenkel N. B., Roizman B. 1972; Ribonucleic acid synthesis in cells infected with herpes simplex virus: control of transcription and of RNA abundance. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 69:2654–2658
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Garfinkle B., Mcauslan B. 1974; Regulation of the herpes simplex virus induced thymidine kinase. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 58:822–829
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Halliburton I. W., Morse L. S., Roizman B., Quinn K. E. 1980; Mapping of the thymidine kinase genes of type 1 and type 2 herpes simplex virus using intertypic recombinants. Journal of General Virology 49:235–253
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Honess R. W., Roizman B. 1974; Regulation of herpesvirus macromolecular synthesis. Cascade regulation of the synthesis of three groups of viral proteins. Journal of Virology 14:8–19
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Jones P. C., Roizman B. 1979; Regulation of herpesvirus macromolecular synthesis. The transcription programme consists of three phases during which both extent of transcription and accumulation of RNA in the cytoplasm are regulated. Journal of Virology 31:299–314
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Kieff E. D., Bachenheimer S. L., Roizman B. 1971; Size, composition and structure of deoxyribonucleic acid of herpes simplex virus subtypes 1 and 2. Journal of Virology 8:125–132
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Kit S., Dubbs D. R. 1977; Regulation of herpes virus thymidine kinase activity in LMÍTK) cells transformed by ultraviolet light-irradiated herpes simplex virus. Virology 76:331–340
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Kit S., Dubbs D. R., Schaffer P. A. 1978; Thymidine kinase activity of biochemically transformed mouse cells after super-infection by thymidine kinase negative, temperature sensitive herpes simplex virus mutants. Virology 85:456–463
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Kit S., Otsuka H., Quavi H., Trkula D., Dubbs D. R., Hazen N. 1980; Biochemical transformation of thymidine kinase deficient mouse cells by herpes simplex virus type 1 DNA fragments purified from hybrid plasmids. Nucleic Acids Research 8:5233–5254
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Klemperer H. G., Haynes G. R., Sheddon W. I. H., Watson D. H. 1967; A virus specific thymidine kinase in BHK21 cells infected with herpes simplex virus. Virology 31:120–128
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Leiden J. M., Buttyan R., Spear P. G. 1976; Herpes simplex virus gene expression in transformed cells. Regulation of the viral thymidine kinase gene in transformed L cells by the products of super-infecting virus. Journal of Virology 20:413–424
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Leiden J. M., Frenkel N., Rapp F. 1980; Identification of the herpes simplex virus DNA sequences present in six herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase-transformed mouse cell lines. Journal of Virology 33:272–285
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Leung W. C., Dimock K., Smiley J. R., Bacchetti S. 1980; Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase transcripts are absent from both nucleus and cytoplasm during infection in the presence of cycloheximide. Journal of Virology 36:361–365
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Ludwig H. O., Biswal N., Benyesh-melnick M. 1972; Studies on the relatedness of herpesviruses through DNA-DNA hybridisation. Virology 49:95–101
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Mcdougall J. K., Masse T. H., Galloway D. A. 1980; Location and cloning of the herpes simplex virus type 2 thymidine kinase gene. Journal of Virology 33:1221–1224
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Mcknight S. L. 1980; The nucleotide sequence and transcript map of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase. Nucleic Acids Research 8:5949–5964
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Mcknight S. L., Gavis E. R. 1980; Expression of the herpes thymidine kinase gene in Xenopus laevis oocytes: an assay for the study of deletion mutants constructed in vitro. Nucleic Acids Research 8:5931–5948
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Minson A. C., Wildy P., Buchan A., Darby G. 1978; Introduction of the herpes simplex thymidine kinase gene into mouse cells using virus DNA or transformed cell DNA. Cell 13:581–587
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Minson A. C., Bastow K., Darby G. 1979a; The herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene as a transmissible genetic element in mammalian cells. In Antiviral Mechanisms in the Control of Neoplasia pp 7–16 Edited by Chandra P. New York: Plenum Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Minson A. C., Darby G., Wildy P. 1979b; Virus specific sequences in cells which carry the herpes simplex virus type 2 thymidine kinase gene. Journal of General Virology 45:489–496
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Morse L. S., Pereira L., Riozman B., Schaffer P. A. 1978; Anatomy of herpes simplex virus DNA. Mapping of viral genes by analysis of polypeptides and functions specified by HSV1 × HSV2 recombinants. Journal of Virology 26:389–410
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Preston C. M. 1979; Control of herpes simplex virus type 1 mRNA synthesis in cells infected with wild type virus or the temperature sensitive mutant ts K. Journal of Virology 291:275–284
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Preston V. G., Davidson A. J., Marsden H. S., Timbury M. C., Subak-sharpe J. H., Wilkie N. M. 1978; Recombinants between herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2: analysis of genome structures and expression of immediate-early polypeptides. Journal of Virology 28:499–517
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Rapp F., Turner N., Schaffer P. A. 1980; Biochemical transformation with temperature sensitive mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1. Journal of Virology 34:704–710
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Reyes G. R., Lafemina R., Hayward S. D., Hayward G. S. 1979; Morphological transformation by DNA fragments of human herpesviruses: evidence for two distinct transforming regions in HSV-1 and HSV-2 and lack of correlation with biochemical transfer of the thymidine kinase gene. Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology 44:629–641
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Rigby P. J. W., Dieckmann M., Rhodes C., Berg P. 1977; Labelling deoxyribonucleic acid to high specific activity in vitro by nick translation with DNA polymerase I. Journal of Molecular Biology 113:237–251
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Schaffer P. A., Celeste-Carter V., Timbury M. C. 1978; Collaborative complementation study of temperature sensitive mutants of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2. Journal of Virology 27:490–504
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Smiley J. R., Wagner M. J., Summers W. P., Summers W. C. 1980; Genetic and physical evidence for the polarity of transcription of the thymidine kinase gene of herpes simplex virus. Virology 102:83–93
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Southern E. M. 1975; Detection of specific sequences among DNA fragments separated by gel electrophoresis. Journal of Molecular Biology 98:503–517
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Summers S. P., Wagner M., Summers W. C. 1975; Possible peptide chain termination mutants in the thymidine kinase gene of a mammalian virus, herpes simplex virus. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 72:4081–4084
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Swanstrom R. C., Wagner E. K. 1974; Regulation of synthesis of herpes simplex virus type 1 viral mRNA during productive infection. Virology 60:522–533
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Varmus H. E., Vogt P. K., Bishop J. M. 1973; Integration of deoxyribonucleic acid specific for Rous sarcoma virus after infection of permissive and non permissive hosts. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 70:3067–3071
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Watson R. J., Clements J. B. 1978; Characterisation of transcription-deficient temperature sensitive mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1. Virology 91:364–379
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Watson R. J., Clements J. B. 1980; A herpes simplex virus type 1 function continuously required for early and late mRNA synthesis. Nature, London 285:329–330
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Wigler M. S., Silverstein S., Lee L. S., Pellicer A., Cheng Y. C., Axel R. 1977; Transfer of purified herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene to cultured mouse cells. Cell 11:223–232
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Wilcox K. W., Kohn A., Sklynskaya E., Roizman B. 1980; Herpes simplex virus phosphoproteins. Phosphate cycles on and off some viral polypeptides and can alter their affinity for DNA. Journal of Virology 3:167–182
    [Google Scholar]
  41. Wilkie N. M., Davison A., Chartrand P., Stow N. D., Preston V. G., Timbury M. C. 1978; Recombination in herpes simplex virus: mapping of mutations and analysis of intertypic recombinants. Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology 43:827–840
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-58-1-127
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-58-1-127
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error