1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Monoclonal antibodies were produced by fusing mouse myeloma cells (SP2) with spleen cells derived from Balb/c mice immunized with purified measles virus. Fifteen independent hybrid cell lines, isolated from two separate fusions, were maintained in culture for up to 5 months without loss of their antibody-secreting activity. Radioimmunoprecipitation and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that in five of the hybrid lines the antibodies were directed against haemagglutinin, in two against the nucleoprotein, and in one against L protein. The remaining seven hybridomas did not precipitate viral antigens under the experimental conditions employed even though they gave positive immunofluorescence against measles virus-infected cells. Monoclonal haemagglutinin antibodies displayed anti-haemagglutinating activity and neutralized measles virus infectivity but not canine distemper virus (CDV).

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/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-54-2-325
1981-06-01
2021-10-22
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