1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

The two dIII fragments of polyoma virus DNA were cloned in the dIII site of plasmid pBR322, and the biological activity of the recombinant plasmids was tested in tissue culture cells. A mixture of recombinant plasmids containing the dIII-A and dIII-B fragments was infectious, but only after cleavage with dIII. Recombinant plasmids containing the dIII-A fragment, but not those containing the dIII-B fragment, induced the transformation of Fischer rat 3T3 cells. These findings indicate that about half of the early region of polyoma virus DNA is not essential for the initiation or the maintenance of transformation.

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1980-09-01
2021-10-28
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