1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

The thymidine kinase induced in lytic infection by each of 36 intertypic recombinants of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and type 2 was identified as type 1 or type 2 by studies on the thermolability of enzyme activity, neutralization with type 1 or type 2 antiserum and agar gel immunodiffusion with type 1 or type 2 thymidine kinase antiserum. Fourteen recombinants induced no thymidine kinase, 12 induced type 1 thymidine kinase and 10 induced type 2 thymidine kinase. Correlation of these results with restriction endonuclease analysis of the DNA of the recombinants with five restriction endonucleases (I, RI, I, I, and II) allowed mapping of the type 1 thymidine kinase gene at 0.300 to 0.309 map unit and the type 2 thymidine kinase gene at 0.295 to 0.315 map unit.

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1980-08-01
2022-01-20
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