1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

The influence of relative humidity (r.h.) on the survival of vesicular exanthema virus (VEV) in aerosols at 1 s and during the next 5 min when generated from phosphate buffer solution containing polyhydroxy compounds, dimethyl sulphoxide, salt or protein has been examined. VEV was sensitive to r.h. in the range of 40 to 60% in the presence of bovine serum albumin, glucose, inositol or phosphate buffer. Addition of sodium chloride stabilized the virus in aerosols at mid-range r.h. both immediately after generation and after a period of storage for 5 min. In the presence of dimethyl sulphoxide or glycerol, virus survival was reduced at 20% r.h. at 1 s and at all r.h. during the first 5 min. Pre-humidification did not produce any significant difference in virus recovery.

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1980-06-01
2022-01-26
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