1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Forty-two primary human-mouse cell hybrids, derived in two separate experiments, were treated with Newcastle disease virus (NDV): eight hybrids were found to produce human interferon and this was shown in every case to be predominantly of the fibroblast type. An extensive analysis was made in terms of karyotype and marker enzymes on all the eight hybrids producing interferon and also on five hybrids which did not produce interferon, five randomly selected hybrids and eleven subclones resistant to diphtheria toxin. The results suggest that, contrary to previous reports, a gene on chromosome 5 is not involved in production of human interferon. Its production was however correlated with the presence of chromosome 9 in the hybrids. Analyses of two sets of human-Chinese hamster hybrid subclones from two different crosses were also consistent with the assignment of a human interferon gene to chromosome 9.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-45-2-309
1979-11-01
2022-01-23
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/45/2/JV0450020309.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-45-2-309&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Atkins G. J., Johnston M. D., Westmacott L. M., Burke D. C. 1974; Induction of interferon in chick cells by temperature-sensitive mutants of Sindbis virus. Journal of General Virology 25:381–390
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Bishun N. P., Williams D. C., Doyle P. 1975; Demonstration of banding pattern of mammalian chromosomes. In Laboratory Manual of Cell Biology pp 76–78 Edited by Hall D., Hawkins S. London: English Universities Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Cox R. P., Krauss M. R., Balis M. E., Dancis J. 1972; Communication between normal and enzyme deficient cells in tissue culture. Experimental Cell Research 74:251–268
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Creagan R. P., Chen S., Ruddle F. H. 1975; Genetic analysis of the cell surface: association of human chromosome 5 with sensitivity to diphtheria toxin in mouse-human somatic cell hybrids. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 72:2237–2241
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Davidson R. L., Gerald P. S. 1976; Improved techniques for the induction of mammalian cell hybridization of polyethylene glycol. Somatic Cell Genetics 2:165–176
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Desmyter J., Stewart W. E. II 1976; Molecular modification of interferon: attainment of human interferon in a conformation active on cat cells but inactive on human cells. Virology 70:451–458
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Harris H., Hopkinson D. A. 1976Handbook of Enzyme Electrophoresis in Human Genetics Amsterdam: North-Holland Publishing Company;
  8. Harris H., Hopkinson D. A. 1977Supplement to the Handbook of Enzyme Electrophoresis in Human Genetics Amsterdam: North-Holland Publishing Company;
  9. Havell E. A., Berman B., Ogburn C. A., Berg K., Paucker H., Vilcek J. 1975; Two antigenically distinct species of human interferon. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 72:2185–2187
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Havell E. A., Yip Y. K., Vilcek J. 1977; Correlation of physicochemical and antigenic properties of human leukocyte interferon subspecies. Archives of Virology 55:121–129
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Jonasson J., Povey S., Harris H. 1977; The analysis of malignancy by cell fusion. VII. Cytogenic analysis of hybrids between malignant and diploid cells and tumours derived from them. Journal of Cell Science 24:217–254
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Kennedy S. I. T., Burke D. C. 1972; Studies on the structural proteins of Semliki Forest virus. Journal of General Virology 14:87–98
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Knight E. Jun 1976; Interferon: purification and initial characterization from human diploid cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 73:520–523
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Lomniczi B. 1970; Systemic induction of interferon in chicks with various NDV strains. I. Relationship between virulence of the virus and the mechanism of interferon formation. Archiv fÜr die gesamte Virusforschun g 30:159–166
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Lomniczi B., Meager A., Burke D. C. 1971; Virus RNA and protein synthesis in cells infected with different strains of Newcastle disease virus. Journal of General Virology 13:111–120
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Mckusick V. A., Ruddle F. H. 1977; The status of the gene map of the human chromosomes. Science 196:390–405
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Mcwilliam M., Finkelstein M. S., Allen P. T., Giron D. J. 1971; Assay of chick interferon by the inhibition of viral ribonucleic acid synthesis. Applied Microbiology 21:959–961
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Mankovitz R., Buchwald M., Baker R. M. 1974; Isolation of ouabain-resistant human diploid fibroblasts. Cell 3:221–226
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Morgan J. M., Faik P. 1977; The expression of the interferon system in clones of Chinese hamster/human hybrid cells. British Journal of Cancer 35:254
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Paucker K., Dalton B. J., Ogbron C. A., Törmä E. 1975; Multiple active sites on human interferons. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 72:4587–4591
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Seabright M. 1971; A rapid banding technique for human chromosomes. Lancet 11:971–972
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Solomon E., Bobrow M., Goodfellow P. N., Bodmer W. F., Swallow D. M., Povey S., Noel B. 1976; Human gene mapping using an X/autosome translocation. Somatic Cell Genetics 2:125–140
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Stewart W. E. II, Desmyter J. 1975; Molecular heterogeneity of human leucocyte interferon: two populations differing in molecular weights, requirements for reactivation and cross-species antiviral activity. Virology 67:68–73
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Swallow D. M., Solomon E., Pajunen L. 1977; Immunochemical analysis of the N-acetyl hexosaminidases, in human/mouse hybrids made using a double selective system. Cytogenetics and Cell Genetics 18:136–148
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Tan Y. H. 1977; Genetics of the human interferon system. In Interferons and Their Actions pp 73–90 Edited By Stewart W. E. II Cleveland, Ohio: Crc Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Tan Y. H., Creagan R. P., Ruddle F. H. 1974; The somatic cell genetics of human interferon: assignment of human interferon loci to chromosomes 2 and 5. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 71:2251–2255
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Tischfield J. A., Ruddle F. H. 1974; Assignment of the gene for adenine phosphoribosyltransferase to human chromosome 16 by mouse-human somatic cell hybridization. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 71:45–49
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Törmä E. T., Paucker K. 1976; Purification and characterization of human leucocyte interferon components. Journal of Biological Chemistry 251:4810–4816
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Van Heyningen V., Craig I., Bodmer W. F. 1973; Genetic control of mitochondrial enzymes in human-mouse somatic cell hybrids. Nature, London 242:509–512
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Walters S., Burke D. C., Skehel J. J. 1967; Interferon production and RNA inhibitors. Journal of General Virology 1:349–362
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Winnipeg Conference 1977; Fourth International Workshop on Human Gene Mapping. Birth Defects: original article series (in the press) 1978 New York: The National Foundation;
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-45-2-309
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-45-2-309
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error