1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

The development of cytopathogenic changes in chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with the herpesvirus of the turkey, strain PB-THV1, and the release of virus particles into the supernatant of infected cultures is accelerated at temperatures higher than 37 °C and is fastest at 41 °C, the normal body temperature of chickens. The growth rate of HVT in CEF cultures was followed by determination of the number of virus genome equivalents within infected cells at various time intervals p.i. A temperature-dependent increase in the amount of virus DNA per infected cell could be detected, which is highest at 41 °C. At all temperatures tested (34, 36, 41 and 43 °C) the number of virus genome equivalents per infected cell ultimately reaches the same level. In the course of infection, virus DNA in CEF cultures at 37 and 41 °C becomes associated with the cellular DNA, as determined by neutral CsCl gradients of the total cellular DNA and hybridization of each fraction with P-labelled virus-specific complementary RNA. Association of virus to cellular DNA occurs earlier at 41 than at 37 °C. However, the same proportion (45%) of the total virus DNA appears ultimately to be associated with cellular DNA at both temperatures. A temperature-shift of CEF cultures infected with PB-THV1 from 41 to 37 °C 24 h p.i. resulted in the same replication kinetics of virus DNA as was found at 41 °C.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-45-2-253
1979-11-01
2021-10-27
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/45/2/JV0450020253.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-45-2-253&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Biegeleisen K., Yanagi K., Rush M. G. 1977; Further studies on the association of herpes simplex virus type 1 DNA with host DNA during productive infection. Virology 83:221–225
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Churchill A. E., Baxendale W., Carrington G. 1973; Viraemia and antibody development in chicks following the administration of turkey herpesvirus. Veterinary Record 92:327–334
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Fanning E., Doerfler W. 1977; Intracellular forms of adenovirus DNA. VI. Quantitation and characterization of the four size classes of adenovirus type 2 DNA in human KB cells. Virology 81:433–448
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Kaaden O., Dietzschold B. 1972; Some characteristics of a herpesvirus of turkeys and its DNA. Oncogenesis and Herpesviruses IARC Scientific Publications; no. 2 pp 82–87
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Kaschka-Dierich C., Bornkamm G. W., Thomssen R. 1979; No homology detectable between Marek’s disease virus (MDV) DNA and herpesvirus of the turkey (HVT) DNA. Medical Microbiology and Immunology 165:223–239
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Kawamura H., King D. J., Anderson D. P. 1969; A herpesvirus isolated from kidney cell culture of normal turkeys. Avian Diseases 13:853–863
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Lee L. F., Kieff E. D., Bachenheimer S. I., Roizman B., Spear P. G., Burmester B. R., Nazerian K. 1971; Size and composition of Marek’s disease virus deoxyribonucleic acid. Journal of Virology 7:289–294
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Lee L. F., Nazerian K., Witter R. L., Leinbach S. S., Boezi J. A. 1978; A phosphonoacetate-resistant mutant of herpesvirus of turkeys. Journal of the National Cancer Institute 60:1141–1146
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Lindahl T., Adams A., Bjursell G., Bornkamm G. W., Kaschka-Dierich C., Jehn U. 1976; Covalently closed circular duplex DNA of Epstein-Barr virus in a human lymphoid cell line. Journal of Molecular Biology 102:511–530
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Marmur J. 1961; A procedure for the isolation of deoxyribonucleic acid from microorganisms. Journal of Molecular Biology 3:208–218
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Schick J., Doerfler W. 1978; Integration of adenovirus type 2 DNA in productively infected cells: results of sequential hybridization experiments. Journal of General Virology 39:365–370
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Solomon J. J., Witter R. L., Nazerian K. 1968; Studies on the etiology of Marek’s disease. I. Propagation of the agent in cell culture. Proceedings of the Society for Biology and Medicine 127:173–177
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Spear P. G., Roizman B. 1972; Proteins specified by herpes simplex virus. V. Purification and structural proteins of the herpesvirion. Journal of Virology 9:143–159
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Witter R. L., Nazerian K., Purchase H. G., Burgyone G. H. 1970; Isolation from turkeys of a cell– associated herpesvirus antigenically related to Marek’s disease virus. American Journal of Veterinary Research 31:525–538
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Witter R. L., Sharma J. M., Offenbecker L. 1976; Turkey herpesvirus infection in chickens: induction of lymphoproliferative lesions and characterization of vaccinal immunity against Marek’s disease. Avian Diseases 20:676–692
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-45-2-253
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-45-2-253
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error