1887

Abstract

Summary

The infectivity of blood and lymphoid organs of mice persistently infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was found to be predominantly associated with lymphocytes and both T and B cells were infectious. A hypothesis is presented in which it is assumed that lymphocytes in carrier mice are infected via their LCM virus-specific antigen receptors, thereby leading to their antigen-triggered clonal expansion followed by infection and functional inactivation.

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1979-03-01
2022-01-26
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