1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

The sequence of events in the infection of TN-368-10 and TN-368-13 cells by nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV) was investigated by using the indirect immunoperoxidase technique. Antisera raised against enveloped nucleocapsids detected homologous antigens at 6 to 8 h post infection which was about 2 h before the appearance of both intracellular and extracellular infectious virus. Similar tests using polyhedrin antiserum showed that polyhedrin is first synthesized at 12 h post infection, 2 to 4 h after the appearance of infectious non-occluded virus. The immunoperoxidase technique was also applied to four other invertebrate cell lines after inoculation with AcNPV. The most significant result was that 90% of AcNPV-inoculated 5 cells produced enveloped nucleocapsid antigens and infectious virus but only 1% or less of the cells produced polyhedrin. This disparity emphasizes the need for assays for NPV infection that are independent of polyhedron production.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-40-3-545
1978-09-01
2021-10-22
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/40/3/JV0400030545.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-40-3-545&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Bellon B., Sapin C., Druet P. 1975; Comparaison de la sensibilité des techniques d’immunofluorescence et d’immunopéroxidase en méthodes directe et indirecte. Annals of Immunology 126C:15–22
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Benjamin D. R., Ray C. G. 1974; Use of immunoperoxidase for the rapid identification of human myxo-viruses and paramyxoviruses in tissue culture. Applied Microbiology 28:47–51
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Gerna G., Vasquez A., McCloud C., Chambers R. W. 1976; The immunoperoxidase technique for rapid human cytomegalovirus identification. Archives of Virology 50:311–321
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Herrmann J. E., Morse S. A., Collins M. F. 1974; Comparison of techniques and immunoreagents used for indirect immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase identification of enteroviruses. Infection and Immunity 10:220–226
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Krywienczyk J. 1967; Immunofluorescence studies of Bombyx mori ovarian tissue cultures infected with nuclear-polyhedrosis virus. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology 9:568–570
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Kurstak E. 1971; The immunoperoxidase technique: localization of viral antigens in cells. In Methods in Virology vol 5 pp 423–444 Edited by Maramorosch K., Koprowski H. New York: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Kurstak E., Kurstak C. 1974; Application of the immunoperoxidase technique in virology and cancer virology: light and electron microscopy. In Viral Immunodiagnosis pp 3–29 New York: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Mcintosh A. H., Padhi S. B. 1976; In vitro and in vivo comparative studies of several nuclear polyhedrosis viruses (NPVs) by neutralization, immunofluorescence, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In Invertebrate Tissue Culture Applications in Medicine, Biology and Agriculture pp 331–338 Edited by Kurstak E., Maramorosch K. New York: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Ohba M., Summers M. D., Hoops P., Smith G. E. 1977; Immunoradiometric assay for baculovirus enveloped nucleocapsids and polyhedrin. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology (in the press)
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Petrusz P., Dimeo P., Ordronneau P., Weaver C., Keefer D. A. 1975; Improved immunoglobulin-enzyme bridge method for light microscopic demonstration of hormone-containing cells of rat adenohypophysis. Histochemistry 46:9–26
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Summers M. D., Arnott H. J. 1969; Ultrastructural studies on inclusion formation and virus occlusion in nuclear polyhedrosis and granulosis virus-infected cells of Trichoplusia ni (Hübner). Journal of Ultrastructure Research 28:462–480
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Summers M. D., Smith G. E. 1976; Comparative studies of baculovirus granulins and polyhedrins. Inter-virology 6:168–180
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Summers M. D., Volkman L. E. 1976; Comparison of biophysical and morphological properties of occluded and extracellular nonoccluded baculovirus from in vivo and in vitro host systems. Journal of Virology 17:962–972
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Volkman L. E., Summers M. D. 1975; Nuclear polyhedrosis virus detection: relative capabilities of clones developed from Trichoplusia ni ovarian cell line TN-368 to serve as indicator cells in a plaque assay. Journal of Virology 16:1630–1637
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Volkman L. E., Summers M. D. 1976; Comparative studies with clones derived from a cabbage looper ovarian cell line TN-368. In Invertebrate Tissue Culture Applications in Medicine, Biology and Agriculture pp 289–296 Edited by Kurstak E., Maramorosch K. New York: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Volkman L. E., Summers M. D., Hsieh C.-H. 1976; Occluded and nonoccluded nuclear polyhedrosis virus grown in Trichoplusia ni: comparative neutralization, comparative infectivity and in vitro growth studies. Journal of Virology 19:820–832
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Wicker R., Avrameas S. 1969; Localization of virus antigens by enzyme-labelled antibodies. Journal of General Virology 4:465–471
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Wood H. A. 1977; An agar overlay plaque assay method for Autographa californica nuclear-polyhedrosis virus. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology 29:304–307
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-40-3-545
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-40-3-545
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error