1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

In order to examine the involvement of microtubules in the virus-induced cytopathic effect (c.p.c.), the effect of virus infection on the formation of micro-tubular paracrystals (PC) induced by 10 µg/ml of vinblastine sulphate in HeLa-S3 cells was examined by phase-contrast microscopy. In poliovirus-infected cells, c.p.e. (cell rounding) and the inhibition of PC formation proceeded in parallel, starting 4 h post-infection. In Sendai virus-infected cells, however, PC formation was not inhibited even 24 h post-infection when most infected cells clearly showed c.p.e. (syncytial formation).

In adenovirus-infected cells, the inhibition of PC formation was observed 9 h before the appearance of c.p.e. Cytosine arabinoside (ara C) did not block the inhibition of PC formation in infected cells, but blocked the appearance of late c.p.e. (nuclear alteration). Cycloheximide blocked both the inhibition of PC formation and the induction of late c.p.e. These results suggest that an early protein synthesized by adenovirus is required for direct or indirect inhibition of the microtubular PC formation. Furthermore, on ultraviolet (u.v.) inactivation of adenovirus both activities (induction of early c.p.e. shown by shrinkage of cytoplasm, and inhibition of PC formation) followed the same inactivation curve and were inactivated at a slower rate than viral infectivity and the activity leading to late c.p.e. The u.v. light sensitive target responsible for the induction of early c.p.e. and the inhibition of PC formation is about 20% of that for infectivity and is in accord with the genome size of the early functioning virus genes.

In herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected cells, the inhibition of PC formation, the appearance of c.p.e. (cell rounding and disappearance of nucleoli) and the synthesis of V antigen proceeded in parallel. These three functions of HSV were not blocked in infected cells even when the synthesis of virus DNA was inhibited by ara C or phosphonoacetic acid (PAA), whereas these three functions were blocked by cycloheximide, suggesting that a protein coded by the input virus genome early after infection inhibits the microtubular PC formation and is responsible for c.p.e. From the u.v. inactivation curve of HSV, it was confirmed that only one-tenth of virus genome was responsible for both activities (induction of c.p.e. and inhibition of PC formation).

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-38-3-535
1978-03-01
2022-08-10
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/38/3/JV0380030535.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-38-3-535&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Allison A. 1967; Lysosomes in virus-infected cells. Perspectives in Virology 5:29–61
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Bablanian R. 1975; Structural and functional alterations in cultured cells infected with cytocidal viruses. Progress in Medical Virology 19:40–83
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Barski G., Robineaux R. 1959; Evolution of herpes simplex cellular lesions observed in vitro by phase contrast microcinematography. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine 101:632–636
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Barski G., Robineaux R., Endo M. 1955; Phase contrast cinematography of cellular lesion produced by poliomyelitis virus in vitro. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine 88:57–59
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Bensch K. G., Malawista S. E. 1969; Microtubular crystals in mammalian cells. Journal of Cell Biology 40:95–107
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Brinkley B. R., Fuller G. M., Highfield D. P. 1975; Cytoplasmic microtubules in normal and transformed cells in culture: analysis by tubulin antibody immunofluorescence. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 72:4981–4985
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Buthala D. A. 1964; Cell culture studies on antiviral agents. I. Action of cytosine arabinoside and some comparisons with 5‒iodo‒2‒deoxyuridine. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine 115:69–77
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Dales S. 1975; Involvement of the microtubule in replication cycles of animal viruses. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 253:440–444
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Ebina T., Ishida N. 1975; Inhibition of formation of microtubular paracrystals in HeLa‒S3 cells by neo‒ carzinostatin. Cancer Research 35:3705–3709
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Ebina T., Kamo I., Homma M., Ishida N. 1969; Autoradiographic studies of HeLa‒S3 cells persistently infected with haemadsorption type 2 virus. Experimental Cell Research 57:359–364
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Edelman G. M., Yahara I. 1976; Temperature‒sensitive changes in surface modulating assemblies of fibroblasts transformed by mutants of Rous sarcoma virus. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 73:2047–2051
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Enders J. F. 1954; Cytopathology of virus infection. Annual Review of Microbiology 8:473–502
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Everett S. F., Ginsberg H. S. 1958; A toxinlike material separable from type 5 adenovirus particles. Virology 6:770–771
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Feldman L. A., Rapp F. 1966; Inhibition of adenovirus replication by 1–β‒d‒arabinofuranosyl‒cytosme. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine 122:243–247
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Fujinaga K., Green M. 1970; Mechanism of viral carcinogenesis by DNA mammalian viruses. VII. Viral genes transcribed in adenovirus type 2 infected and transformed cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 65:375–382
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Keir H. M. 1968; Virus-induced enzymes in mammalian cells infected with DNA viruses. In Molecular Biology of Viruses vol 18 pp 67–99 London: Cambridge University Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Krishan A., Hsu D. 1969; Observations on the association of helical polyribosomes and filaments with vincristine induced crystals in Earle’s L–cell fibroblasts. Journal of Cell Biology 43:553–563
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Luftig R. B., Weihing R. R. 1975; Adenovirus binds to rat brain microtubules in vitro. Journal of Virology 16:696–706
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Okada Y. 1958; The fusion of Ehlich’s ascites tumour cells caused by HVJ virus in vitro. Biken’sJournal 1:103–110
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Olmsted J. B., Borisy G. G. 1973; Microtubules. Annual Review of Biochemistry 42:507–540
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Overby L. R., Robishaw E. E., Schleicher T. B., Ruter A., Shipkowitz N. L., Mao J. C. H. 1974; Inhibition of herpes simplex virus replication by phosphonoacetic acid. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 6:360–365
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Owellen R. J., Donigian D. W., Hartke C. A., Dickerson R. M., Kuhar M. J. 1974; The binding of vinblastine to tubulin and to particulate fractions of mammalian brain. Cancer Research 34:3180–3186
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Pereira H. G. 1958; A protein factor responsible for the early cytopathic effect of adenoviruses. Virology 6:601–611
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Pereira H. G. 1961; The cytopathic effect of animal viruses. Advances in Virus Research 8:245–285
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Pettersson U., Hoglund S. 1969; Structural proteins of adenoviruses. III. Purification and characterization of adenovirus type 2 penton antigen. Virology 39:90–106
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Pope J. H., Rowe W. P. 1964; Immunofluorescent studies of adenovirus 12 tumours and cells transformed or infected by adenoviruses. Journal of Experimental Medicine 120:577–587
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Reed L. J., Muench H. A. 1938; A simple method for determining fifty percent endpoints. American Journal of Hygiene 27:493–497
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Russell W. C., Skehel J. J. 1972; The polypeptides of adenovirus‒infected cells. Journal of General Virology 15:45–57
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Saborio J. L., Oberg B. 1976; In vivo and in vitro synthesis of adenovirus type 2 early proteins. Journal of Virology 17:865–875
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Seeds N. W., Gilman A. G., Amano T., Nirenberg M. W. 1970; Regulation of axon formation by clonal lines of a neural tumour. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 66:160–167
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Watanabe Y., Kudo H., Graham A. F. 1967; Selective inhibition of reovirus ribonucleic acid synthesis by cycloheximide. Journal of Virology 1:36–44
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Watkins J. F. 1964; Adsorption of sensitized sheep erythrocytes to HeLa cells infected with herpes simplex virus. Nature, London 202:1364–1365
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Westwood J. C. N. 1963; Virus pathogenicity. In Mechanism of Virus Infection pp 255–307 Edited by Smith W. New York: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-38-3-535
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-38-3-535
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error