1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Interferon derived from the human lymphoblastoid cell line, Namalva, was fractionated by antibody affinity chromatography into two antigenically distinct interferon subspecies. At least 13% of the total Namalva interferon activity possessed the F antigenic determinant found on human interferon derived from fibroblast cultures, while the bulk of the Namalva interferon activity had the Le antigenic determinant characteristic for human leukocyte interferon. The separated Le and F subspecies of Namalva interferon differed in the degree of their heterospecific activities on bovine cells. The Le moiety resembled crude leukocyte interferon in that it was highly active in bovine cells. The F component of Namalva interferon showed a lower degree of activity in bovine cells, thus resembling crude fibroblast interferon. When analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by isoelectric focusing, crude Namalva interferon qualitatively resembled crude leukocyte interferon.

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1978-01-01
2021-10-27
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