1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Inoculation of wild-type (wt) VSV intracerebrally (i.c.) in Swiss weanling mice results in a rapidly fatal illness with death in two to three days. In contrast, i.c. inoculation of temperature-sensitive () VSV mutants G31 and G22, but not G11 or G41, results in a more slowly progressive central nervous system (CNS) disease with distinct neurological signs. Studies undertaken to evaluate the neurovirulence of VSV mutants indicated that the ability of mutants to produce pathological changes in the CNS of mice appeared related to their ability to replicate to high titre in brain and spinal cord. However, replication of VSV mutants in brain alone was not sufficient to produce clinical illness. More importantly, the ability of VSV mutants to replicate at non-permissive temperatures did not appear to correlate with neurovirulence. VSV harvests from brains and spinal cords of mice infected with each of the mutants were temperature-insensitive. In spite of their temperature-insensitivity, the biological behaviour of viruses recovered from CNS tissues was, surprisingly, not that which was characteristic of revertant clones. Virus isolates recovered from infected CNS tissues, despite their temperature-insensitivity, behaved biologically like the original stocks of mutant virus. These data suggest that temperature-sensitivity is not directly correlated with the unique pathogenesis elicited by infection with VSV mutants.

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1977-05-01
2021-10-21
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