1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Hydrangea ringspot virus has been purified to near homogeneity. Virus nucleic acid was identified as single-stranded RNA with an S value of 33.6 before and 21.1 after formaldehyde denaturation. Nucleic acid mol. wt. determinations made by linear log sucrose density gradient centrifugation gave values of 2.25 × 10 and 2.14 × 10, respectively, for native and formaldehyde-treated RNA. Electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gels before and after formaldehyde denaturation gave mol. wt. values of 2.64 × 10 and 2.03 × 10. The values from formaldehyde denatured RNAs are considered the most reliable. Thermal denaturation profiles showed a T of 55.2 °C in 0.1 -sodium phosphate, pH 7.0, and a hyperchromicity of 22.4%.

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1977-01-01
2021-09-25
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