1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Partial denaturation maps of 30 HSV-1 DNA molecules have been obtained using a procedure designed to avoid possible hydrolysis of the DNA at alkalilabile bonds. From the denaturation pattern of the long unique DNA region these molecules were divided into two groups comprised of 16 and 14 molecules. Histogram plots relating the percentage denaturation to position on the DNA for these two groups were aligned in a manner appropriate to the HSV-1 genome model. It was apparent that these groups had the orientation of the long region inverted with respect to each other. Similarly, from the denaturation maps of the short unique region, the molecules were divided into two groups each comprising 15 molecules. Alignment of the histogram plots of these groups indicated that the orientation of the short region was inverted in one group relative to the other. These partial denaturation data confirm the presence of four HSV-1 genome arrangements resulting from the possible combinations of inversions of the two unique DNA regions.

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/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-33-1-125
1976-10-01
2024-04-17
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