1887

Abstract

Summary

The mol. wt. and molar ratios of the III and I fragments of HSV-1 DNA and the RI fragments of HSV-2 DNA have been determined. Results obtained suggest that DNA isolated from both HSV-1 and HSV-2 consists of molecules with four different sequence arrangements which are present in similar amounts. Our explanation of the cleavage patterns of these four genome arrangements with the different restriction enzymes is presented.

Some of the possible implications of these four genome arrangements for genetic recombination are discussed.

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1976-02-01
2022-05-23
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