1887

Abstract

Summary

The pattern of polyadenylated messenger RNA (mRNA) synthesis in BHK cell monolayers, infected under defined conditions with herpes simplex type 1 virus has been investigated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of pulse-labelled RNA isolated by oligo dT-cellulose chromatography. Two classes of mRNA molecules were synthesized in infected cells; these were not detected in uninfected cells. The rate of synthesis of the larger, 18 to 30S RNA class reached a maximum soon after infection and then declined, whereas the rate of synthesis of the 7 to 11S RNA class did not reach a maximum until much later and did not decline. In the presence of cytosine arabinoside, the rate of mRNA synthesis in infected cells was reduced but the electrophoretic pattern remained the same.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-28-3-299
1975-09-01
2022-01-22
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/28/3/JV0280030299.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-28-3-299&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Atherton K. T., Darby O. 1974; Extraction of RNA from mammalian tissue culture cells. Analytica Biochemistry 57:403–412
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Aviv H., Leder P. 1972; Purification of biologically active globin messenger RNA by chromatography on oligothymidylic acid-cellulose. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 69:1408–1412
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Bachenheimer S. L., Roizman B. 1972; Ribonucleic acid synthesis in cells infected with herpes simplex virus. VI. Polyadenylic acid sequences in viral messenger ribonucleic acid. Journal of Virology 10:875879
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Brawerman G., Mendecki J., Lee S. Y. 1972; A procedure for the isolation of mammalian messenger ribonucleic acid. Biochemistry 11:637–641
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Clegg J. C. S., Kennedy S. I. T. 1974; Polyadenylic acid sequences in the virus RNA species of cells infected with Semliki Forest virus. Journal of General Virology 22:331–345
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Darnell J. E., Philipson L., Wall R., Adesnik M. 1971a; Polyadenylic acid sequences’, role in conversion of nuclear RNA into mRNA. Science, New York 174:507–510
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Darnell J. E., Wall R., Tushinski R. J. 1971h; An adenylic acid rich sequence in messenger RNA of HeLa cells and its possible relationship to reiterated sites in DNA. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 68:1321–1325
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Dunn A. R., Gallimore P. H., Jones K. W., McDougall J. K. 1973; In situ hybridisation of adenovirus RNA and DNA. II. Detection of adenovirus-specific DNA in transformed and tumour cells. International Journal of Cancer u:628–636
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Flanagan J. F. 1967; Virus specified ribonucleic acid synthesis in KB cells infected with herpes simplex virus. Journal of Virology 1:583–590
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Frenkel N., Roizman B. 1972; Ribonucleic acid synthesis in cells infected with herpes simplex virus: controls of transcription and RNA abundance. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 69:2654–2658
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Hay J., Koteles G. J., Keir H. M., Subak-Sharpe H. 1966; Herpes virus specified ribonucleic acid. Nature, London 210:387–390
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Honess R. W., Roizman B. 1973; Proteins specified by herpes simplex virus. XI. Identification and relative molar rates of synthesis of structural and non-structural herpes virus polypeptides in the infected cell. Journal of Virology 12:1347–1365
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Honess R. W., Roizman B. 1974; Regulation of herpes virus macromolecular synthesis. 1. Cascade regulation of the synthesis of three groups of viral proteins. Journal of Virology 14:8–19
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Honess R. W., Watson D. H. 1974; Herpes simplex virus specific polypetides studied by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of immune precipitates. Journal of General Virology 22:171–185
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Huang H. L., Szabocsik J. M., Randall C. C., Gentry G. A. 1971; Equine abortion (herpes) virus-specific RNA. Virology 45:381–389
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Kates J. 1970; Transcription of the vaccinia virus genome and the occurrence of polyriboadenylic acid sequences in messenger RNA. Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology 35:743–752
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Luff S. 1972; The effect of arabinosyl cytosine on the growth of herpes simplex virus in baby hamster kidney cells. Ph.D. Thesis University of Birmingham;
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Peacock A. C., Dingman C. W. 1968; Molecular weight estimation and separation of ribonucleic acid by electrophoresis in agarose-acrylamide composite gels. Biochemistry 7:668–674
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Penman S., Rosbash M., Penman M. 1970; Messenger and heterogeneous nuclear RNA in HeLa cells: differential inhibition by cordycepin. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 67:1878–1885
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Powell K. L. 1973; Studies on the components of herpes simplex virus particles. Ph.D. Thesis University of Birmingham;
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Rakusanova T., Ben-Porat T., Himeno M., Kaplan A. S. 1971; Early functions of the genome of herpesvirus. I. Characterization of the RNA synthesized in cycloheximide-treated infected cells. Virology 46:877–889
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Rakusanova T., Ben-Porat T., Kaplan A. S. 1972; Effect of herpesvirus infection on the synthesis of cell specific RNA. Virology 49:537–548
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Roizman B., Bachenheimer S., Wagner E. K., Savage T. 1970; Synthesis and transport of RNA in herpesvirus-infected mammalian cells. Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology 35:753–771
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Ross L. J. N., Cameron K. R., Wildy P. 1972; Ultraviolet irradiation of herpes simplex virus: reactivation processes and delay in virus multiplication. Journal of General Virology 16:299–311
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Russell W. C. 1962; A sensitive and precise plaque assay for herpes virus. Nature, London 19s:1028–1029
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Russell W. C., Gold E., Keir H. M., Omura D. H., Watson H., Wildy P. 1964; The growth of herpes simplex virus and its nucleic acid. Virology 22:103–110
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Silverstein S., Bachenheimer S. L., Frenkel N., Roizman B. 1973; Relationship between post-transcriptional adenylation of herpes virus RNA and messenger RNA abundance. Proceeedings of the National A cademy of Sciences of the Unites States of America 70:2101–2104
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Swanstrom R. I., Wagner E. K. 1974; Regulation of synthesis of herpes simplex type I virus mRNA during productive infection. Virology 60:522–533
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Thouless M. E. 1972; Serological properties of thymidine kinase produced in cells infected with type I or type 2 herpes virus. Journal of General Virology 17:307–315
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Vantsis J. T., Wildy P. 1962; Interaction of herpes virus and HeLa cells: comparison of cell killing and infective center formation. Virology 17:225–232
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Wagner E. K. 1972; Evidence for transcriptional control of the herpes simplex virus genome in infected human cells. Virology 47:502–506
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Wagner E. K., Swanstrom R. I., Stafford M. G. 1972; Transcription of the herpes simplex virus genome in human cells. Journal of Virology 10:675–682
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Wilkie N. M. 1973; The synthesis and substructure of herpes virus DNA: the distribution of alkali labile single strand interruptions in HSV-i DNA. Journal of General Virology 21453–467
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-28-3-299
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-28-3-299
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error