1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Comparative karyological studies have been made on the J-96 line of human leukaemic cells, which are susceptible to enteroviruses, and on cell strains derived from this line which are persistently infected with Coxsackie B5 virus or free from infective virus but possessing high specific resistance to Coxsackie B3 or B5 viruses. It was shown that the karyotypes of these cell strains were characterized by reduced numbers of small acrocentric chromosomes of group G. It is suggested that group G chromosomes in cells of human origin incorporate genes which control alkaline phosphatase activity and the production of specific substances essential to adsorption and intracellular development of Coxsackie B viruses.

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1974-04-01
2022-01-21
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