1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

A strain of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus (O BFS 1860) held in aerosols at high relative humidity (r.h.) was more unstable when suspended in bovine salivary fluid than when suspended in cell culture fluid. This instability was due to the suspending medium rather than to the passage history of the virus and was not related to the high pH of the salivary fluid or to surface inactivation. The inactivation at high r.h. was caused by an undefined organic molecule which was dialysable and sensitive to heating at 70 °C but not at 60 °C.

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/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-20-3-311
1973-09-01
2021-10-16
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