1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

It has been shown by infectious centre assay of mixedly infected cells that mutants of HSV type 1 and type 2 are able to complement each other in many, but not all combinations. This complementation pattern has some unusual and unexpected features. Progeny tests on virus from infectious centres showed the presence of both parental types and also that of recombinants some of which have a novel phenotype. Successive progeny tests demonstrated that a substantial proportion of genomes retain the potential for segregating with respect to the and or the plaque morphology markers. The one recombinant so far tested behaved as intermediate between types 1 and 2 in neutralization tests.

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/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-18-3-347
1973-03-01
2022-01-19
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