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Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, yellow-pigmented, and facultatively aerobic bacterium, designated strain GPA1, was isolated from plastic waste landfill soil in the Republic of Korea. The cells were non-motile short rods exhibiting oxidase-negative and catalase-positive activities. Growth was observed at 15–40 °C (optimum, 30 °C), at pH 6.0–9.0 (optimum, pH 7.0–8.0) and in the presence of 0–2.5 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 0 %). Menaquinone-7 was the sole respiratory quinone, and iso-C, C 5, and iso-C 3-OH were the major cellular fatty acids (>10 % of the total fatty acids). Phosphatidylethanolamine was identified as a major polar lipid. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and 120 concatenated marker protein sequences revealed that strain GPA1 formed a distinct lineage within the genus . The genome of strain GPA1 was 6078 kb in size with 53.8 mol% G+C content. Strain GPA1 exhibited the highest similarity to T16R-86, with a 98.6 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, but their average nucleotide identity and digital DNA–DNA hybridization values were 82.5 and 25.9 %, respectively. Based on its phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic characteristics, strain GPA1 represents a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GPA1 (=KACC 23415=JCM 36644).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Institute of Biological Resources (Award NIBR No. 2023-02-001)
    • Principle Award Recipient: CheOk Jeon
  • Chung-Ang University (Award 2024)
    • Principle Award Recipient: DaeSeung Lee
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2024-07-04
2024-07-23
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