1887

Abstract

Two Gram-stain-negative, straight rods, non-motile, asporogenous, catalase-negative and obligately anaerobic butyrate-producing strains, HLW78 and CYL33, were isolated from faecal samples of two healthy Taiwanese adults. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA and DNA mismatch repair protein MutL () gene sequences revealed that these two novel strains belonged to the genus . On the basis of 16S rRNA and gene sequence similarities, the type strains AF52-21(98.3–98.1 % and 79.0–79.5 % similarity), A2-165(97.8–97.9 % and 70.9–80.1 %), APC922/41-1(97.1–97.3 % and 80.3–80.5 %), CM04-06(97.8–98.0% and 78.3 %) and ATCC 27768(97.3–97.4 % and 82.7–82.9 %) were the closest neighbours to the novel strains HLW78 and CYL33. Strains HLW78 and CYL33 had 99.4 % both the 16S rRNA and gene sequence similarities, 97.9 % average nucleotide identity (ANI), 96.3 % average amino acid identity (AAI), and 80.5 % digital DNA–DNA hybridization (dDDH) values, indicating that these two strains are members of the same species. Phylogenomic tree analysis indicated that strains HLW78 and CYL33 formed an independent robust cluster together with ATCC 27768. The ANI, AAI and dDDH values between strain HLW78 and its closest neighbours were below the species delineation thresholds of 77.6–85.1 %, 71.4–85.2 % and 28.3–30.9 %, respectively. The two novel strains could be differentiated from the type strains of their closest species based on their cellular fatty acid compositions, which contained C 7 and lacked C and C 6, respectively. Phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic test results demonstrated that the two novel strains HLW78 and CYL33 represented a single, novel species within the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HLW78 (=BCRC 81397=NBRC 116372).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Ministry of Economic Affairs (Award 113-EC-17-A-22–0643)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Chien-HsunHuang
  • Ministry of Economic Affairs (Award 113-EC-17-A-22–0525)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Chien-HsunHuang
  • National Science and Technology Council (Award 112-2320-B-080–001)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Chien-HsunHuang
  • National Science and Technology Council (Award 112-2740-B-A49-002)
    • Principle Award Recipient: HuangChien-Hsun
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2024-06-07
2024-06-19
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