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Abstract

Strain S30A2, isolated from the acid mine drainage sediment of Mengzi Copper Mine, Yunnan, is proposed to represent a novel species of the sulphur-oxidizing genus . Cells were Gram-stain-negative, non-endospore forming, highly motile with one or two monopolar flagella and rod-shaped. The strain was mesophilic, growing at 30–50 °C (optimum, 38 °C), acidophilic, growing at pH 2.0–4.5 (optimum, pH 2.5), and tolerant of 0–4 % (w/v; 684 mol l) NaCl. The 16S rRNA gene-based sequence analysis showed that strain S30A2 belongs to the genus and shows the largest similarity of 96.6 % to the type strain KU. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain S30A2 was 59.25 mol%. The average nucleotide identity ANIb and ANIm values between strain S30A2 and KU were 70.95 and 89.78 %, respectively and the digital DNA–DNA hybridization value was 24.9 %. Strain S30A2 was strictly aerobic and could utilize elementary sulphur and tetrathionate to support chemolithotrophic growth. The major cellular fatty acid of S30A2 was Cω7. The respiratory quinones were ubiquinone-8 and ubiquinone-7. Based upon its phylogenetic, genetic, phenotypic, physiologic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain S30A2 is considered to represent a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S30A2 (=CGMCC 1.17059=KCTC 72580).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Nature Science Foundation of China (Award 91851206)
    • Principle Award Recipient: ChengyingJiang
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2024-05-28
2024-06-19
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