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Abstract

Two Gram-stain-negative, facultative aerobic, catalase- and oxidase-positive, and non-motile rod bacteria, strains BL and W38, that were isolated from soil and freshwater, respectively, were taxonomically characterized. Both strains optimally grew at 30 °C and pH 7.0 in Reasoner's 2A medium and contained ubiquinone-8 as the sole respiratory quinone. As major fatty acids (>10 %), strain BL contained iso-C and summed features 3 and 9 (comprising iso-C 2-OH and/or C 7/ω6 and iso-C 9 and/or C 10-methyl, respectively), whereas strain W38 contained iso-C, iso-C and summed feature 9. Diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine as major polar lipids and phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol as minor polar lipids were detected in both strains. The DNA G+C contents of strains BL and W38 were 68.3 and 65.3 %, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene and genome sequences revealed that strains BL and W38 formed a tight phylogenetic lineage with species, and they shared 98.8 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity and 75.5 % average nucleotide identity (ANI) and 16.6 % digital DNA–DNA hybridization (dDDH) values, indicating that they are different species. Strains BL and W38 were most closely related to BUT-6 and PYM5-11 with 97.7 and 98.0 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, respectively. ANI and dDDH values between strain BL and BUT-6 and between strain W38 and DSM 21667 were 78.5 and 21.6% and 75.3 and 21.0 %, respectively. Based on their phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genomic properties, strains BL and W38 represent two different novel species of the genus , for which the names sp. nov. and sp. nov. are proposed. The type strains of and are BL (=KACC 22831=JCM 35402) and W38 (=KACC 22832=JCM 35749), respectively.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Chung-Ang University (Award 2021)
    • Principle Award Recipient: CheOk Jeon
  • Korea Environmental Industry and Technology Institute (Award 2021003420003)
    • Principle Award Recipient: CheOk Jeon
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2023-04-24
2024-07-23
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