1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming and rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain NS-102, was isolated from herbicide-contaminated soil sampled in Nanjing, PR China, and its taxonomic status was investigated by a polyphasic approach. Cell growth of strain NS-102 occurred at 16–42 °C (optimum, 30 °C), at pH 5.0–8.0 (optimum, pH 6.0) and in the presence of 0–3.5 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, without addition of NaCl). The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain NS-102 shows high similarity to that of YJ03 (96.9 % similarity), followed by T16R-129 (93.8 %) and QH (93.6 %). Average nucleotide identity, average amino acid identity and digital DNA–DNA hybridization values between the draft genomes of strain NS-102 and YJ03 were 72.5, 69.4 and 18.6%, respectively. The only respiratory quinone was MK-7, and phosphatidylethanolamine and unidentified lipids were the major polar lipids. The major cellular fatty acids of strain NS-102 contained high amounts of iso-C (24.6 %), iso-C3-OH (24.1 %), iso-C G (16.6 %) and summed feature 3 (C 6 and/or C 7) (15.6 %). The G+C content of the total DNA was determined to be 40.0 mol%. The morphological, physiological, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses clearly distinguished this strain from its closest phylogenetic neighbours. Thus, strain NS-102 represents a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NS-102 (=CCTCC AB 2017249=KCTC 62322).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Graduate Student Innovation Foundation of Huaibei Normal University (Award cx2022040)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Zhen-BoMao
  • Major Program of Natural Science Research in Colleges and Universities in Anhui Province (Award KJ2020A0038)
    • Principle Award Recipient: LongZhang
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 31900077)
    • Principle Award Recipient: LongZhang
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2022-06-14
2022-06-25
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