1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-positive, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped, obligately anaerobic bacterium, designated strain BP52G, was isolated from the hindgut of a Silver Drummer () fish collected from the Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that the isolate belonged to the family in the phylum Firmicutes and was most closely related to with 93.3 % sequence identity. Isolate BP52G grew on agar medium containing mannitol as the sole carbon source. White, opaque and shiny colonies of the isolate measuring approximately 1 mm diameter grew within a week at 20–28 °C (optimum, 24 °C) and pH 6.9–8.5 (optimum, pH 7.8). BP52G tolerated the addition of up to 1 % NaCl to the medium. Formate and acetate were the major fermentation products. The major cellular fatty acids were C, C and C. The genome sequence of the isolate was determined. Its G+C content was 30.7 mol%, and the 72.65 % average nucleotide identity of the BP52G genome to its closest neighbour with a completely sequenced genome ( JCM 1298) indicated low genomic relatedness. Based on the phenotypic and taxonomic characteristics observed in this study, a novel genus and species gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed for isolate BP52G (=NZRM 4757=JCM 34692).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (Award UOAX1608)
    • Principle Award Recipient: WilliamLindsey White
  • Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (Award UOAX1608)
    • Principle Award Recipient: KendallD. Clements
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2022-05-10
2022-05-24
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