1887

Abstract

A strictly anaerobic, motile bacterium, designated as strain NSJ-9, was isolated from human faeces. Cells were Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, non-pigmented, and spiral-shaped or slightly curved rods with flagella. Optimal growth in M2GSC medium was observed at 37 °C (growth range 30–45 °C) and pH 6.5–7.0 (growth range 6.5–7.5) under anaerobic conditions. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that strain NSJ-9 formed a distinct phylogenetic lineage that reflects a new genus in the family , with high levels of similarity to A2-183 (95.2 %), ATCC 33874 (95.2 %), DSM 9787 (95.2 %), MZ 5 (94.8%) and M72/1 (94.4 %). Genomic similarity (average nucleotide identity and digital DNA–DNA hybridization) values between strain NSJ-9 and its phylogenetic neighbours were below 71 and 31 %, respectively, indicating that strain NSJ-9 represented a novel species. The average amino acid identity and the percentage of conserved proteins between strain NSJ-9 and other related members of the family were below 63 and 50 %, respectively, supporting that strain NSJ-9 was a member of a new genus. The predominant cellular fatty acids of strain NSJ-9 were C and C 2-OH, and major polar lipids were glycolipids. The end products of glucose fermentation were acetate, propionate, iso-butyrate, butyrate and valerate. Phylogenetic and phylogenomic lineage, pairwise determined genome identity analysis suggested that strain NSJ-9 represents a novel genus in the family . The genome size of strain NSJ-9 is 2.56 Mbp with 44.9 mol% G+C content. Collectively, the genotypic and phenotypic differences between phylogenetic relatives suggested strain NSJ-9 represented a novel species of a new genus, for which the name gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of is NSJ-9 (=CGMCC 1.32469=KCTC 15957).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • China Microbiome Initiative (CMI) supported by Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS-CMI)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Shuang-JiangLiu
  • Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (Award (Grant No. XDB38020300))
    • Principle Award Recipient: Shuang-JiangLiu
  • National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (Award (No.2019YFA0905601))
    • Principle Award Recipient: ChangLiu
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2022-05-13
2022-05-18
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