1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming, rod-shaped (0.4–0.6 µm×2.5–3.2 µm), flagellated bacterium, designated strain YB-6, was isolated from activated sludge of an anaerobic tank at Weizhou marine oil mining wastewater treatment plant in Beihai, Guangxi, PR China. The culture conditions were 25–45 °C (optimum, 37 °C), pH 4–12 (pH 7.0) and NaCl concentration of 0–7 % w/v (0%). Strain YB-6 grew slowly in petroleum wastewater and removed 68.2 % of the total organic carbon in petroleum wastewater within 10 days. Concentrations of naphthalene, anthracene and phenanthrene at an initial concentration of 50 mg l were reduced by 32.8, 40.4 and 14.6 %, respectively, after 7 days. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain YB-6 belongs to cluster I and is most closely related to CK55 (98.5 % similarity). The genome size of strain YB-6 was 3.96 Mb, and the G+C content was 26.5 mol%. The average nucleotide identity value between strain YB-6 and CK55 was 81.9 %. The major fatty acids in strain YB-6 were C FAME, C FAME and summed feature 4 (unknown 14.762 and/or C FAME). The main polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, five unidentified aminophospholipids, one unidentified glycolipid and one unidentified aminolipid. Diaminopimelic acid was not detected in the strain YB-6 cell walls. Whole-cell sugars mainly consisted of ribose and galactose. Based on the results of phenotypic and genotypic analyses, strain YB-6 represents a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YB-6 (=GDMCC 1.2529=JCM 34754).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 51978189)
    • Principle Award Recipient: QinglinXie
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2022-04-22
2022-05-18
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