1887

Abstract

Gram-positive coccoid bacteria were isolated from the nasal cavities of pigs and calves as well as from axillar and inguinal skin regions of pigs. Phylogenetic analysis of seven strains based on complete genome, 16S rRNA, , , and gene sequences and MALDI-TOF MS profiles revealed that they belonged to the genus with the closest relatedness to , subsp. and subsp. . DNA relatedness of the type strain JEK37 with the type strains of , subsp. and subsp. was 23.4, 23.1 and 23.0 % by digital DNA–DNA hybridization and 80.39, 80.45 and 80.87 % by average nucleotide identity (ANI) calculations, confirming that they do not belong to the same species. The DNA G+C content of JEK37 was 35.65 mol%. The novel strains can be differentiated from KM 45013 by the ability to fermentate -ribose and by the absence of DNAase production and haemolysis, from subsp. CCUG 15606 by the ability to fermentate sucrose and from both species by the inability to grow in 9 and 12% NaCl. They differ from subsp. by the presence of α-glucosidase. The most common fatty acids of JEK37 were C, C ω9 and C. Known polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, aminolipid, aminoglycolipid, aminophospholipid, glycolipid and phospholipid. Cell-wall peptidoglycan of JEK37 was of type A3α -Lys–Gly–L-Ser–Gly (similar to A11.3) and the respiratory quinolone was menaquinone 6. Based on their genotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, these strains represent a novel species of the genus , for which we propose the name sp. nov. The type strain is JEK37 (=DSM 112712=CCOS 1982).

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2022-02-14
2022-05-18
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