1887

Abstract

Strain 3F2 was isolated from a soil sample obtained from the surface of Deception Island, Antarctica. The isolate was a Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterium, and its colonies were red to pink in colour. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain 3F2 belonged to the genus , family and was most closely related to DG5B (97.0% sequence similarity), PB17 (96.9%), DG7A (96.8%) and S1-2-2-6 (96.5%). Growth occurred at 4–20 °C (optimum, 10 °C), up to 1.0 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 0%) and pH 6.0–8.0 (optimum, pH 7.0). The chemotaxonomic characteristics of strain 3F2, which had MK-7 as its predominant menaquinone and summed feature 3 (C 7 and/or C 6), iso-C, anteiso-C and C 5 as its major fatty acids, were consistent with classification in the genus . The polar lipid profile of strain 3F2 comprised phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified aminolipids, two unidentified aminophospholipids and three unidentified polar lipids. The genome of strain 3F2 was 6.56 Mbp with a G+C content of 61.5 mol%. Average nucleotide identity (ANI) values between 3F2 and the other species of the genus were found to be low (ANIm <87.0%, ANIb <82.0% and OrthoANIu <83.0%). Furthermore, digital DNA–DNA hybridization and average amino acid identity values between strain 3F2 and the closely related species ranged from 20.0 to 26.3% and from 64.0 to 81.1 %, respectively. Based on the results of our phylogenetic, phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic analyses, it is concluded that strain 3F2 represents a novel species within the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 3F2 (=KCTC 72468=CGMCC 1.13716).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award NSFC, grant number 31070002)
    • Principle Award Recipient: JianliZhang
  • National Key Research and Development Program of China (Award 2016YFC0501302)
    • Principle Award Recipient: JianliZhang
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2022-01-27
2022-05-18
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