1887

Abstract

Two bacterial strains, designated as SYSU D00720 and SYSU D00722, were isolated from a desert sandy soil sample collected from Gurbantunggut Desert in Xinjiang, north-west China. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-motile, rod-shaped, oxidase-positive and catalase-negative. Colonies were circular, opaque, convex, smooth, orange on Reasoner’s 2A (R2A) agar. The isolates were found to grow at 4–45 °C (optimum, 28–30 °C), at pH 6.0–7.0 (optimum, 7.0) and with 0–1.5 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 0%). Growth was observed on R2A agar, Luria–Bertani agar and nutrient agar, but not on trypticase soy agar. The polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, sphingoglycolipid, two unidentified aminolipids, one unidentified glycolipid, one unidentified aminoglycolipid, one unidentified aminophospholipid, one unidentified phospholipid and two unidentified lipids. The main fatty acids (>10%) were C 6, summed feature 8 (C 7 and/or C 6) and C. The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone-10 and the major polyamine was -homospermidine. The genomic DNA G+C content was 66.0 mol%. Strains SYSU D00720 and SYSU D00722 were nearly identical with a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 99.6 %, and 100.0 % average nucleotide identity (ANI), average amino acid identity (AAI) and digital DNA–DNA hybridization (dDDH) values. Phylogenetic analyses clearly demonstrated that these two strains belonged to the same species of the genus , and had highest sequence similarity to KCTC 23642 (97.3 %). The ANI, AAI and dDDH values of strains SYSU D00720 and SYSU D00722 to KCTC 23642 were both 73.2, 69.9 and 19.2 %, respectively. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic distinctiveness, strains SYSU D00720 and SYSU D00722 represent a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SYSU D00720 (=MCCC 1K05154=NBRC 115061).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province, China (Award 2016A030312003)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Wen-JunLi
  • Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region regional coordinated innovation project (Award 2021E01018)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Wen-JunLi
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 32061143043)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Wen-JunLi
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 32000005)
    • Principle Award Recipient: LeiDong
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2022-01-21
2022-05-18
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