1887

Abstract

A new strictly anaerobic bacterium, strain DYL19, was enriched and isolated with phosphite as the sole electron donor and CO as a single carbon source and electron acceptor from anaerobic sewage sludge sampled at a sewage treatment plant in Constance, Germany. It is a Gram-positive, spore-forming, slightly curved, rod-shaped bacterium which oxidizes phosphite to phosphate while reducing CO to biomass and small amounts of acetate. Optimal growth is observed at 30 °C, pH 7.2, with a doubling time of 3 days. Beyond phosphite, no further inorganic or organic electron donor can be used, and no other electron acceptor than CO is reduced. Sulphate inhibits growth with phosphite and CO. The G+C content is 45.95 mol%, and dimethylmenaquinone-7 is the only quinone detectable in the cells. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and other chemotaxonomic properties, strain DYL19 is described as the type strain of a new genus and species, gen. nov., sp. nov.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (Award 01092017)
    • Principle Award Recipient: ZhuqingMao
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2021-12-08
2022-01-27
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