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Abstract

Bacterial strain PAGU 2197, which was isolated from soil collected from the bottom of a pond in Japan, is characterized in this study. Cells of strain PAGU 2197 were aerobic, Gram-negative, short rod-shaped, non-motile, flexirubin-producing, oxidase-positive, catalase-positive and lecithinase-negative. A phylogenetic study based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and multilocus sequence analysis (, and ) indicated that strain PAGU 2197 belongs to the genus and is a member of an independent lineage including CCUG 60111 (sequence similarity, 95.9 %), CCUG 60566 (93.4 %) and CCUG 60103 (91.6 %). The average nucleotide identity values were 80.83–85.04 %. Because average nucleotide identity values of 95–96 % exceed the 70 % DNA–DNA hybridization cutoff value for species discrimination, strain PAGU 2197 represents a novel species in the genus . The genome of strain PAGU 2197 was 4 967 738 bp with a G+C content of 35.5 mol%. The sole respiratory quinone of strain PAGU 2197 was MK-6; the major cellular fatty acids were iso-C, iso-C 3OH, summed feature 3 (C 7 and/or C 6) and summed feature 9 (iso-C 9 and/or C 10-methyl); and the major polar lipids were phosphoglycolipids and phosphatidylethanolamine. These results indicate that strain PAGU 2197 should be classified as representing a novel species in the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed, with strain PAGU 2197 (=NBRC 114264=CCUG 75150) as the type strain.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JP) (Award 16K08355)
    • Principle Award Recipient: YoshiakiKawamura
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/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/ijsem.0.005135
2021-12-08
2022-01-28
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