1887

Abstract

A novel Gram-stain-positive, strictly aerobic, short rod-shaped bacterium, designated 2C, was isolated from freshly packaged microfiltered milk. This strain was able to grow within the NaCl concentration range of 0–5 % (w/v), temperature range of 8–37 °C (optimally at 30 °C) and at pH 6.0–10.0. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain 2C was closely related to species of the genus , with the highest sequence similarity (99.2 %) to DSM 20427 as well as DSM 18909 (=YM18-098). The phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA genes showed that strain 2C clustered with DSM 18909. However, the phylogenetic tree based on concatenated 16S rRNA and four housekeeping genes showed that strain 2C clustered with DSM 20427. Furthermore, the phylogenomic tree showed that strain 2C clustered with DSM 20427 and DSM 18909. The major respiratory quinones were MK-10, MK-11 and MK-12. The predominant cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C, iso-C and anteiso-C. The polar lipid composition of strain 2C consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, three unidentified glycolipids and two unidentified lipids. The cell-wall peptidoglycan type was a variant of B1 {Gly} [-Lys] -Glu--Lys, with the amino acids lysine, glycine, alanine and glutamic acid. The whole-cell sugars consisted of galactose, glucose, ribose and minor amounts of rhamnose. In addition, strain 2C showed a glycolyl-type cell wall. The genomic DNA G+C content was 69.8mol%, while the average nucleotide identity (ANI) and digital DNA-DNA hybridization (dDDH) values with the closely related species were below the recognized thresholds of 95–96 % ANI and 70 % DDH for species definition. Based on the phenotypic and genotypic data, strain 2C (=LMG 32277=CECT 30329) is considered to represent a new species, for which the name sp. nov. is proposed.

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2021-11-22
2021-12-03
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