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Abstract

A Gram-stain-positive, non-motile and coccus-shaped bacterium, designated strain LNNU 331112, was isolated from the composite rhizosphere soil of the halophyte (Bunge) Freitag and Schütze, which was collected in Xinjiang, north-west China. Growth occurred at 10–45 °C, pH 6.0–11.0 and in the presence of 0–10 % NaCl (w/v). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence suggested that strain LNNU 331112 belonged to the genus and showed 95.6, 95.5 and 95.4 % sequence similarities to DSM 45258, CGMCC 4.3532 and CGMCC 1.15478, respectively. The estimated digital DNA–DNA hybridization relatedness values between strain LNNU 331112 and the type strains of DSM 45258, CGMCC 4.3532 and CGMCC 1.15478 were 18.9, 19.3 and 18.3 %, respectively. The average nucleotide identity values between strain LNNU 331112 and DSM 45258, CGMCC 4.3532 and CGMCC 1.15478 were 72.6, 72.7 and 72.3 %, respectively. The genome sequence of strain LNNU 331112 showed 69.0–72.3 % average amino acid identity values in comparison with the related genome sequences of three validly published species. The genome of strain LNNU 331112 was 3.47 Mb, with a DNA G+C content of 68.4 mol%. A total of 3182 genes were identified as protein-coding in strain LNNU 331112. Genomic analysis revealed that a number of genes involved in osmotic pressure regulation, intracellular pH homeostasis and potassium (K) uptake protein were found in strain LNNU 331112. The predominant menaquinones were MK-8 (44.6 %) and MK-7 (55.4 %), which differentiated strain LNNU 331112 from other three recognized species. Major fatty acids (>10 %) were C ω8 (33.8 %), C (23.3 %), C (12.8 %) and summed feature 3 (12.9 %), which also clearly separated strain LNNU 331112 from three recognized species. The polar lipid profile of strain LNNU 331112 included diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, one unidentified glycolipid, one unidentified phospholipid and two unidentified lipids. According to the results of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic analyses, strain LNNU 331112 is considered to represent a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LNNU 331112 (=KCTC 39808=CGMCC 1.17107=DSM 103463).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Department of Education of Liaoning Province (Award LJ2020011)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Hong-FeiWang
  • Natural Science Foundation of Liaoning Province (Award 2019-ZD-0466)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Hong-FeiWang
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2021-11-30
2022-01-28
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