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Abstract

A novel moderately thermophilic, anaerobic, heterotrophic bacterium (strain SY095) was isolated from a hydrothermal vent chimney located on the Southwest Indian Ridge at a depth of 2730 m. Cells were Gram-stain-positive, motile, straight to slightly curved rods forming terminal endospores. SY095 was grown at 45–60 °C (optimum 50–55 °C), pH 6.0–7.5 (optimum 7.0), and in a salinity of 1–4.5 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 2.5 %). Substrates utilized by SY095 included fructose, glucose, maltose, -acetyl glucosamine and tryptone. Casamino acid and amino acids (glutamate, glutamine, lysine, methionine, serine and histidine) were also utilized. The main end products from glucose fermentation were acetate, H and CO. Elemental sulphur, sulphate, thiosulphate, sulphite, fumarate, nitrate, nitrite and Fe(III) were not used as terminal electron acceptors. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C (60.5%) and C (7.6 %). The main polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, five unidentified phospholipids and two unidentified aminophospholipids. No respiratory quinones were detected. The chromosomal DNA G+C content was 30.8 mol%. The results of phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that SY095 was closely related to Ra1766H (95.8 % 16S rRNA gene sequence identity). SY095 exhibited 78.1 % average nucleotide identity (ANI) to Ra1766H. The DNA–DNA hybridization (DDH) value indicated that SY095 shared 22.7 % DNA relatedness with Ra1766H. On the basis of its phenotypic, genotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, SY095 is suggested to represent a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SY095 (=JCM 34213=MCCC 1K04191). An emended description of the genus is also proposed.

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2021-11-26
2022-01-29
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