1887

Abstract

Strain Q3-56, isolated from Arctic tundra soil, was found to be a Gram-stain-negative, yellow-pigmented, oxidase- and catalase-positive, non-motile, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped and aerobic bacterium. Strain Q3-56 grew optimally at pH 7.0 and 28 °C. The strain could tolerate up to 1 % (w/v) NaCl with optimum growth in the absence of NaCl. The strain was not sensitive to oxacillin and ceftazidime. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain Q3-56 belonged to the genus . Strain Q3-56 showed the highest sequence similarities to T17 (96.58 %), Gsoil 043 (96.50 %), NS28 (96.43 %) and QTA69 (96.43 %). The predominant respiratory isoprenoid quinone was identified as MK-7, The polar lipid profile of strain Q3-56 was found to contain one phosphatidylethanolamine, three unidentified aminolipids, three unidentified lipids and one unidentified phospholipid. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was determined to be 49.1 mol%. The main fatty acids were summed feature 3 (comprising C 7/C 6), iso-C, C 5 and iso-C 3-OH. On the basis of the evidence presented in this study, a novel species of the genus , sp. nov., is proposed, with the type strain Q3-56 (=CCTCC AB 2019271=KCTC 72739). Emended descriptions of , and are also provided.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • chinese polar scientific strategy research fund (Award IC201706)
    • Principle Award Recipient: FangPeng
  • national natural science foundation of china (Award Grant No. 42076230)
    • Principle Award Recipient: FangPeng
  • r&d infrastructure and facility development program of the ministry of science and technology of the people’s republic of china (Award Grant No. NIMR-2020-8)
    • Principle Award Recipient: FangPeng
  • national key r&d program of china (Award 2018YFC1406701)
    • Principle Award Recipient: FangPeng
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2021-11-30
2022-01-29
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