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Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, yellow-pigmented and non-motile rod-shaped bacterium, designated as GrpM-11, was isolated from coastal seawater collected from the East Sea, Republic of Korea. Strain GrpM-11 could grow at 10–40 °C (optimum, 35 °C), at pH 5.5–9.5 (optimum, pH 7.0) and in the presence of 0–8 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 3–4 %). Cells hydrolysed aesculin, gelatin and casein, but could not reduce nitrate to nitrite. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that this strain formed a distinct phylogenic lineage with ATAX6-5 (96.2 % sequence identity) and DSM 26725 (96.2 % identity) and belonged to the genus . The predominant isoprenoid quinone was ubiquinone-10. The polar lipid profile of strain GrpM-11 consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, sphingoglycolipid and three unknown glycolipids. Cellular fatty acid analysis indicated that summed feature 8 (C 7 and/or C 6; 42.8 %), C (19.0 %), C 7 11-methyl (13.3 %) and C 7 (8.0 %) were the major fatty acids. The DNA G+C content of strain GrpM-11 was 63.7 mol%. Through whole genome sequence comparisons, the digital DNA–DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity values between strain GrpM-11 and two species of the genus were revealed to be in the ranges of 19.0–22.0 % and 76.3–79.7 %, respectively. Based on the results of polyphasic analysis, strain GrpM-11 represents a novel species of the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GrpM-11 (KCCM 43343=JCM 34665).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Ministry of Education (Award NRF-2017R1D1A3B04033871)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Dong-HyunRoh
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2021-10-11
2021-10-24
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