1887

Abstract

The evolutionary relationships among species of the family were examined based on 255 available genomes representing >85 % of the species from this family. In a phylogenetic tree based on concatenated sequences of 118 core proteins, most species of the genus grouped within one large cluster which also included members of the genera and . Within this large cluster 18–30 clades/subclades of species of the genus consisting of between 1 and 36 species, were observed. However, a number of species of the genus branched outside of this main cluster and were interspersed among other genera of the family . This included a strongly supported clade (Pertucinogena clade) consisting of 19 mainly halotolerant species. The distinctness of this clade from all other members of the family is strongly supported by 24 conserved signature indels (CSIs) in diverse proteins that are exclusively found in all members of this clade. Nine uncharacterized members of the genus also shared these CSIs and they branched within the Pertucinogena clade, indicating their affiliation to this clade. On the basis of the strong evidence supporting the distinctness of the Pertucinogena clade, we are proposing transfer of species from this clade into a novel genus gen. nov. also branches outside of the main cluster and groups reliably with and . Six identified CSIs are uniquely shared by these three species and we are proposing their integration into the emended genus , which has priority over the name . We are also proposing transfer of the deep-branching , for which 22 exclusive CSIs have been identified, into the genus gen. nov. Lastly, we present strong evidence that the species and are misclassified into the genus and that they are specifically related to the genera and , respectively. In addition, we are also reclassifying ‘ as sp. nov. (Type strain: G-6302=ATCC 31363=BCRC 13035).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Alliance Grant, NSERC
    • Principle Award Recipient: BashudevRudra
  • Ontario Ministry of Research, Innovation and Science
    • Principle Award Recipient: RadheyS. Gupta
  • Canadian Network for Research and Innovation in Machining Technology, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (Award RGPIN-2019-06397)
    • Principle Award Recipient: BashudevRudra
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2021-10-24
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