1887

Abstract

A novel bacterium, designated strain Msb3, was recently isolated from leaves of the yam family plant (). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that this strain belonged to the genus with as nearest validly named neighbour taxon (99.3 % sequence similarity towards the type strain). Earlier genome sequence analysis revealed a genome of 8.35 Mb in size with a G+C content of 62.5 mol%, which was distributed over two chromosomes and three plasmids. Here, we confirm that strain Msb3 represents a novel species. DNA–DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity (OrthoANIu) analyses towards LB400 yielded 58.4 % dDDH and 94.5 % orthoANIu. Phenotypic and metabolic characterization revealed growth at 15 °C on tryptic soy agar, growth in the presence of 1 % NaCl and the lack of assimilation of phenylacetic acid as distinctive features. Together, these data demonstrate that strain Msb3 represents a novel species of the genus for which we propose the name sp. nov. The type strain is Msb3 (=LMG 31881, DSM 111632, CECT 30342).

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2021-09-20
2021-10-23
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