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Abstract

This study describes JE7A12 (=ATCC TSD-225=NCTC 14479), an isolate from the ruminal content of a dairy cow. Phenotypic and genotypic traits of the isolate were explored. JE7A12 was found to be a strictly anaerobic, catalase-negative, oxidase-negative, coccoid bacterium that grows in chains. The API 50 CH carbon source assay detected fermentation of -glucose, -fructose, -galactose, glycogen and starch. HPLC showed acetate to be the major fermentation product as a result of carbohydrate fermentation. Phylogenetic analysis of JE7A12 based on 16S rRNA nucleotide sequence and amino acid sequences from the whole genome indicated a divergent lineage from the closest neighbours in the genus . The results of 16S rRNA sequence comparison, whole genome average nucleotide identity (ANI) and DNA G+C content data indicate that JE7A12 represents a novel species which we propose the name with JE7A12 as the type strain.

Keyword(s): genome , rumen and Ruminococcus
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2021-08-11
2022-05-24
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