1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-positive, yellow-pigmented, non-motile actinobacterial strain, designated as BIT-GX5, was isolated from a sesame husks compost collected in Beijing, PR China. This bacterium was found to be able to grow in the temperature range from 16 to 50 °C and had an optimal growth temperature at 45 °C. Its taxonomic position was analysed using a polyphasic approach. The 16S rRNA gene sequence (1482 bp) of strain BIT-GX5 was most similar to ATCC BAA-886 (99.45%), LMG 16121 (99.17%) and RS-7-4 (98.75%). The results of phylogenetic analyses, based on the 16S rRNA gene, concatenated sequences of five housekeeping genes (, , , and ) and genome sequences, placed strain BIT-GX5 in a separate lineage among the genus within the family . The major polar lipids of strain BIT-GX5 were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, aminophospholipid and aminolipid. The major isoprenoid quinone was MK-9(H), while the cell-wall sugars were galactose, rhamnose, glucose and mannose. The peptidoglycan type was A4α -Lys–-Ser-Asp. The major fatty acids were anteiso-C and iso-C, which were similar to other members in the genus Results of DNA–DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity calculations plus physiological and biochemical tests exhibited the genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain BIT-GX5 from the other members of the genus . Therefore, strain BIT-GX5 is considered to represent a novel species within the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BIT-GX5 (= CGMCC 1.17687 = KCTC 49391).

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Support Program for Longyuan Youth and Fundamental Research Funds for the Universities of Gansu Province (CN)
    • Principle Award Recipient: YuYang
  • Beijing Institute of Technology Research Fund Program for Young Scholars (Award No. 3160011181804)
    • Principle Award Recipient: YuYang
  • Young Elite Scientist Sponsorship Program of the China Association of Science and Technology (Award No. 2017QNRC001)
    • Principle Award Recipient: YuYang
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award No. 31961133015 and No. 51603004)
    • Principle Award Recipient: YuYang
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2021-07-20
2021-07-31
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