1887

Abstract

A novel pale orange-coloured bacterium, designated strain SYSU D00532, was isolated from sandy soil collected from the Gurbantunggut desert in Xinjiang, PR China. Cells of strain SYSU D00532 were found to be aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, oxidase-positive, catalase-positive, motile and rod-shaped with a single polar or subpolar flagellum. Growth occurred at 15–45 °C (optimum, 28–37 °C, pH 5.0–8.0 (optimum, pH 6.0–7.0) and with 0–1.5% NaCl (w/v; optimum, 0.5 %). The major polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. Unidentified aminolipids, unidentified polar lipids, an unidentified aminophospholipid and an unidentified phospholipid were also detected. The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone-10 and the major fatty acids were summed feature 8 (C 7 and/or C 6), C and C cyclo 8. The genomic DNA G+C content was 69.8 mol%. Results of phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain SYSU D00532 belonged to the family and showed 93.4% ( 2622), 93.2% ( 10-1-101), 93.2% (‘’ YIM 93097) and 92.4% ( M71) similarities. Based on the phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data, strain SYSU D00532 is proposed to represent a new species of a new genus, named gen. nov., sp. nov., within the family . The type strain is SYSU D00532 (=KCTC 82269=CGMCC 1.18631=MCCC 1K04984). We also propose the reclassification of to a new genus as comb. nov., and the transfer of the genera and from the family to the family based on the phylogenetic results.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 32061143043)
    • Principle Award Recipient: Wen-JunLi
  • National Natural Science Foundation of China (Award 32000005)
    • Principle Award Recipient: LeiDong
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2021-07-20
2021-07-31
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