1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic, motile bacterium, designated strain RKSG073, was isolated from the sea sponge , collected off the west coast of San Salvador, The Bahamas. Cells were curved-to-spiral rods with single, bipolar (amphitrichous) flagella, oxidase- and catalase-positive, non-nitrate-reducing and required salt for growth. RKSG073 grew optimally at 30–37 °C, pH 6–7, and with 2–3 % (w/v) NaCl. The predominant fatty acids of RKSG073 were summed feature 8 (Cω6 and/or Cω7) and C. Major isoprenoid quinones were identified as Q-10 and Q-9. Phylogenetic analyses of nearly complete 16S rRNA genes and genome sequences positioned strain RKSG073 in a clade with its closest relative AH-MY2 (92.1 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), which subsequently clustered with Gri0909, ZC80 and type species of the genera , and . The DNA G+C content calculated from the genome of RKSG073 was 42.2 mol%. On the basis of phylogenetic distinctiveness and polyphasic analysis, here we propose that RKSG073 (culture deposit numbers: ATCC collection = TSD-74, BCCM collection = LMG 29869) represents the type strain of a novel genus and species within the family , order and class , for which the name gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Canadian Network for Research and Innovation in Machining Technology, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (Award 462303)
    • Principle Award Recipient: StaceyR Goldberg
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2021-07-06
2021-08-02
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