1887

Abstract

A novel Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, asporogenous, catalase-positive and oxidase-negative, non-motile, golden-yellow pigmented, rod-shaped bacterium with casein-degrading ability, designated strain GCR10, was isolated from roots of rice plants collected from a paddy field near Dongguk University, Republic of Korea. The results of subsequent 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that GCR10 shares the highest sequence identity with VQ-6316s (98.3%). Strain GCR10 grew at 2–32 °C (optimum, 25 °C), at pH 6.0–8.0 (optimum, pH 7.0) and in the presence of 0–2.0% (w/v) NaCl (optimum in the absence of NaCl). The novel strain was able to produce carotenoid and flexirubin-type pigments. The predominant menaquinone was MK-6 and the major fatty acids were identified as iso-C, iso-C 3-OH and iso-Cω9. The polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, four unidentified aminoglycolipids, two unidentified aminolipids and two unidentified glycolipids. The genome of GCR10 is 4.3 Mb in length with a DNA G+C content of 36.5 mol%. Average nucleotide identity, digital DNA–DNA hybridization and average amino acid identity values between GCR10 and VQ-6316s were 82.1, 25.2 and 84.3 %, respectively, which clearly indicates that the novel strain is distinct from its closest relative. The demand for natural biodegradable pigments isolated frominsects, plants or microorganisms is increasing day by day because of their beneficial pharmacological properties. Here, we describe a novel strain that produces two types of pigment, carotenoid and flexirubin. On the basis of the results from phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic analyses, strain GCR10 represents a novel species of the genus , and the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GCR10 (=KACC 21707=NBRC 114715).

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2021-07-07
2021-07-29
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