1887

Abstract

Four obligatory anaerobic, Gram-stain-positive, non-motile and rod-shaped organisms (HF-1365, HF-1362, HF-1101 and HF-4214) were isolated from faecal samples of healthy Chinese subjects. Results of 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses showed that these isolates belong to the genera (strains HF-1365 and HF-1362) and (strains HF-1101 and HF-4214), closest to (both 98.6 %) and (98.0 and 97.8 %), respectively. The whole genome sequences of strains HF-1365 and HF-1101 were 2.3 and 4.2 Mb in size with 61.7 and 66.2 mol% DNA G+C content, respectively. The average nucleotide identity and digital DNA–DNA hybridization values indicated that strains HF-1365 and HF-1101 represent novel species in the genera and . Major fatty acid constituents (>10 %) of strains HF-1365 and HF-1362 were C (24.7 and 23.9 %), C (21.9 and 20.6 %) and summed feature 1 (Ciso H/C 3OH; 12.8 and 10.8 %); those of strains HF-1101 and HF-4214 were C 9c (32.4 and 33.1 %) and C (13.9 and 14.0 %). Strain HF-1365 had phospholipid, glycolipid, lipid and phosphoglycolipid without any known quinones, while strain HF-1101 had diphosphatidylglycerol as the major polar lipid and MK-7 (80.7 %) as the predominant quinone. On the basis of their phylogenetic and phenotypic characteristics, strains HF-1365 and HF-1101 represent two distinct species, respectively, in the genera and , for which the names sp. nov. (type strain HF-1365=CGMCC 1.17435=GDMCC 1.1705=JCM 33601) and sp. nov. (type strain HF-1101=CGMCC 1.17436=GDMCC 1.1668=JCM 33773) are proposed.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Research Units of Discovery of Unknown Bacteria and Function (Award 2018RU010)
    • Principle Award Recipient: JianguoXu
  • National Science and Technology Major Project of China (Award 2017ZX10303405-005-002)
    • Principle Award Recipient: HanZheng
  • National Science and Technology Major Project of China (Award 2017ZX10303405-002)
    • Principle Award Recipient: HanZheng
  • National Science and Technology Major Project of China (Award 2018ZX10712001-018)
    • Principle Award Recipient: ShanLu
  • National Key R&D Program of China (Award 2019YFC1200505)
    • Principle Award Recipient: JingYang
  • National Key R&D Program of China (Award 2019YFC1200500)
    • Principle Award Recipient: JingYang
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